Trending

Ijmb 2022 Literature in English Answers

NON AFRICAN NOVELS

IJMB

NUMBER 3

The Great Gatsby, money is a huge motivator in the characters’ relationships, motivations, and outcomes. Most of the characters reveal themselves to be highly materialistic, their motivations driven by their desire for money and things: Daisy marries and stays with Tom because of the lifestyle he can provide her, Myrtle has her affair with Tom due to the privileged world it grants her access to, and Gatsby even lusts after Daisy as if she is a prize to be won. After all, her voice is “full of money—that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it. . . . High in a white palace the king’s daughter, the golden girl. . . .” (7.106).

So how exactly does materialism reveal itself as a theme, how can it help us analyze the characters, and what are some common assignments surrounding this theme? We will dig into all things money here in this guide.

*LITERATURE (DRAMA & POETRY)*

(10)

The poem addresses the problem of leadership crisis in Africa and the lingering problem of endless search for credible and transparent leader who is brave, courageous, fearless and compassionate and our inability to find any because of lack of trust. In the poem, the animals in the forest don’t trust one another to take up the leadership role of the animal kingdom. “When the zebra says it’s his right to lead/the pack points to the duplicity of his stripes”. “The elephant trudges into power tussle/but its colleagues dread his trampling feet”… Zebra and elephant therefore are not fit enough to rule because they lack good leadership quality despite the fact that facially, they are qualified.

However, it is the same with the African masses who do not trust one another to take over the leadership role of the country. This lack of trust is caused by religious and ethnic diversity wherein an Hausa man prefers to vote or bequeath power to his fellow brother irrespective of the leadership quality possessed by the person, while the Ibo man thinks that it is only his brother who is a Christian and Ibo by tribe, is the only person that is able and capable to lead.

Also, the lion who is the king of the jungle feels that he is competent enough to lead, but the antelope who is a faithful follower remembers his ferocious (violent) nature and how he unleashes it on the weaker animals, he changes his mind towards him. Even hyena and giraffe cannot lead because they are not only visionless but also lack trust.

It is quite evident in this poem and it is responsible for underdevelopment not only in Africa but also in Nigeria. In the poem, the animals are not united enough to challenge the lion who “…stakes his claim to leadership of the pack”. His dominance and ability to lord it over and subdue other animals cannot be properly put to check because the led, that is, the followers, don’t have one voice and cannot also alter their situation. Hyena says he is qualified and credible enough to take the animal kingdom to the next level, but impalas say, he cannot, because of his deadly appetite for dead animal meats. The animals are at one another’s neck as they just can’t agree on whom to choose to lead them. This lack of unity and spirit of oneness among the animals can be likening to the disunity among the African leaders and the masses. This is largely because of the religious and ethnic diversity of the masses, which is responsible for their inability to pick any qualified person among them to rule and team up against the ruling class and wrestle power from them.

Towards the ending of the poem, the persona tries to suggest the likely solution to the problem of disunity among our leaders. “A good leader should be “tough like a tiger, compassionate like a doe / transparent like a river, mysterious like a lake”. With the above-mentioned attribute, a leader can cause a change and unity to strive among the people.

*

He labels her friends “sycophantic phlegmatic and of course, top of the bill pusillanimous.

Jimmy also hates Alison’s mother because she is dedicated to her middle classrooms and her concern about her daughter marrying a man beneath her social status that she even hire a detective to watch Jimmy because he does not trust him. This makes him angry at middle-class value. He therefore calls Alison’s mum “old bitch” and she should be dead.

Consequently, Jimmy’s anger against every member of the play can be attributed to his rough and thorny background and his loss of childhood. Jimmy is frail and insecure because he says he was exposed to death, loneliness and pain at a very early age.

*THEME OF SUFFERING*

As journey’s go, the “Journey of the Magi” really blows. It begins and ends with suffering, and the Magi suffer a whole lot during the journey, too, what with all the bad weather and even worse people. But there’s a bigger suffering going on here, too. There’s the psychological suffering of the dying culture of the Magi, plus the physical and mental anguish we know this kid, Jesus, will experience as he grows up to become Christ. So what do we make of all this? We think Eliot’s reminding us that a whole lot about spirituality and religion revolves around suffering, and that suffering often comes with religious transformation. It can’t be disputed that the theme of suffering is dominant in the poem and links to other themes.

One of the aspect in which the theme of suffering is portrayed is death. To the Magi, the loss of their traditions to impending Christianity is like staring both death and defeat in the face at once. Death doesn’t make its real entrance until the end of “Journey of the Magi,” but when it finally does sashay onto the scene, it puts all too fine a point on what the coming of Jesus means to the Magi and their people.

Another aspect the theme of suffering was evident in the poem is religion. The birth of Jesus, the three kings, and Biblical allusions galore. “Journey of the Magi” has religion written all over it, and that’s just the obvious stuff. Since the whole poem is about the coming of Christianity, every word is packed with religious meaning that can be picked apart with a fine-toothed comb. Allow Shmoop.

Fear also promulgate the theme of suffering in the poem, “the journey of the Magi” There are two distinct layers of fear in “Journey of the Magi.” First, there’s the Magus-as-character fear – the kind that’s pretty easy to identify by the end of the poem. And then there’s the kind of fear that that first kind implies. Now before you go asking yourself what in the world Shmoop’s babbling on about, allow us to explain: by making the Magus a character that’s super wary of spiritual change, Eliot’s secretly telling us about his own fears surrounding his recent religious conversion. After all, Eliot grew up with no real spiritual upbringing, and even though his conversion to Anglicanism was certainly his choice, that doesn’t necessarily mean it was an easy one. Which is maybe why fear comes out with guns a-blazin’ in this poem.

The poem also talks of the suffering of tradition as well. The “Journey of the Magi” is chock full of traditions being challenged left and right. There’s this strange sense of impending doom about the birth of Jesus, and the dawning knowledge that the old way of life for these Magi is long gone. You’d think that a poem about the birth of Jesus would be all kinds of happy about ushering in a new era of religious exaltation, but mostly this poem is moping about a long-dead past. Hey, it’s Eliot. His glass was almost always half-empty. If not shattered altogether.

It is obvious that the poet made good use of several themes to explain the theme of suffering as it is more dominant.

*

[6/16, 1:21 PM] EXAM EMPIRES: *SECTION B*

*(6)*

Jimmy attacks Alison both verbally and physically throughout the play since his wife reminds him of everything he despises from the beginning. Jimmy verbally attacks Alison and her family members because he wants her to answer a question about an article in the newspaper but Alison defends that she has not read it yet. He humiliates and attacks Alison and her brother, Nigel.

Contrary to Jimmy, Alison does not give any direct reaction against Jimmy’s aggressive behavior. She prefers to maintain silence. She knows that if she gives any reaction to his attack, he will be triumphant. Alison’s silence and seeming ignorance can also be considered as a weapon in order to save her from Jimmy’s assaults. Jimmy not only attack Alison but also other members of her family and her friends. He calls her parents “Militant, arrogant and full of malice”

Troy is chiefly responsible for this desire for order, though for a different reason his wife Rose also craves it. Troy is caught in a world in which he feels he does not belong. He carries with him the scars, oppression, and disorder of his Southern childhood, the abuse of his father, and an unwelcome Pittsburgh. Troy’s sense of responsibility comes from his own father’s bitter care for him and his siblings. His father’s loyalty to his family can be seen as poisonous; his father’s betrayal poisons his own relationship with Corey. Ultimately, Troy becomes his father. He abandons Rose for another woman and stubbornly refuses to repent for his sins. He also abandons his own brother and son, severing his relationships in his own quest for freedom. Troy demonstrates the idea that responsibility becomes as much a liability as a virtue.

*

[6/16, 12:20 PM] EXAM EMPIRES: (1)

In Senehun and Mendeland at large, women are not treated as equals of men. Women are considered fragile, vulnerable and incapable of managing crises. At the beginning of the play when Gbanya drags Yoko into the inner chamber, he claims that he needs Yoko more than her Sande girls. To him, women have no responsibility than to satisfy men’s sexual urge.

Initially, Gbanya has promised Yoko she would be his successor. However, with troubles around, he feels reluctant to handover the throne to her because he believes women cannot handle a land at war. This is the same stance of Lamboi. The excuse he gives for wanting to kill Gbanya is because he does not want the latter to appoint Yoko as his successor.

In Mendeland, women usually are not allowed into the Poro cult. Yoko is the only exception. In the village, there is a certain prejudice held against women. They are considered inferior and except for Yoko who forges ahead, women are not assigned ruling positions.

*: *LITERATURE IN ENGLISH*

*SECTION D*

*NON-AFRICAN POETRY*

*NUMBER 12*

*(1) DEATHS*

To the Magi, the loss of their traditions to impending Christianity is like staring both death and defeat in the face at once. Death doesn’t make its real entrance until the end of “Journey of the Magi,” but when it finally does sashay onto the scene, it puts all too fine a point on what the coming of Jesus means to the Magi and their people.

*(2) RELIGIONS*

The birth of Jesus, the three kings, and Biblical allusions galore. “Journey of the Magi” has religion written all over it, and that’s just the obvious stuff. Since the whole poem is about the coming of Christianity, every word is packed with religious meaning that can be picked apart with a fine-toothed comb. Allow Shmoop.

*(3) FEAR*

There are two distinct layers of fear in “Journey of the Magi.” First, there’s the Magus-as-character fear – the kind that’s pretty easy to identify by the end of the poem. And then there’s the kind of fear that that first kind implies. Now before you go asking yourself what in the world Shmoop’s babbling on about, allow us to explain: by making the Magus a character that’s super wary of spiritual change, Eliot’s secretly telling us about his own fears surrounding his recent religious conversion. After all, Eliot grew up with no real spiritual upbringing, and even though his conversion to Anglicanism was certainly his choice, that doesn’t necessarily mean it was an easy one. Which is maybe why fear comes out with guns a-blazin’ in this poem.

*(4) TRADITION and CUSTOMS*

The “Journey of the Magi” is chock full of traditions being challenged left and right. There’s this strange sense of impending doom about the birth of Jesus, and the dawning knowledge that the old way of life for these Magi is long gone. You’d think that a poem about the birth of Jesus would be all kinds of happy about ushering in a new era of religious exaltation, but mostly this poem is moping about a long-dead past. Hey, it’s Eliot. His glass was almost always half-empty. If not shattered altogether.

*(5) SUFFERING*

As journey’s go, the “Journey of the Magi” really blows. It begins and ends with suffering, and the Magi suffer a whole lot during the journey, too, what with all the bad weather and even worse people. But there’s a bigger suffering going on here, too. There’s the psychological suffering of the dying culture of the Magi, plus the physical and mental anguish we know this kid, Jesus, will experience as he grows up to become Christ. So what do we make of all this? We think Eliot’s reminding us that a whole lot about spirituality and religion revolves around suffering, and that suffering often comes with religious transformation.

*LITERATURE IN ENGLISH*

*SECTION D*

*NON-AFRICAN POETRY*

*NUMBER 12*

*(1) DEATHS*

To the Magi, the loss of their traditions to impending Christianity is like staring both death and defeat in the face at once. Death doesn’t make its real entrance until the end of “Journey of the Magi,” but when it finally does sashay onto the scene, it puts all too fine a point on what the coming of Jesus means to the Magi and their people.

*(2) RELIGIONS*

The birth of Jesus, the three kings, and Biblical allusions galore. “Journey of the Magi” has religion written all over it, and that’s just the obvious stuff. Since the whole poem is about the coming of Christianity, every word is packed with religious meaning that can be picked apart with a fine-toothed comb. Allow Shmoop.

*(3) FEAR*

There are two distinct layers of fear in “Journey of the Magi.” First, there’s the Magus-as-character fear – the kind that’s pretty easy to identify by the end of the poem. And then there’s the kind of fear that that first kind implies. Now before you go asking yourself what in the world Shmoop’s babbling on about, allow us to explain: by making the Magus a character that’s super wary of spiritual change, Eliot’s secretly telling us about his own fears surrounding his recent religious conversion. After all, Eliot grew up with no real spiritual upbringing, and even though his conversion to Anglicanism was certainly his choice, that doesn’t necessarily mean it was an easy one. Which is maybe why fear comes out with guns a-blazin’ in this poem.

*(4) TRADITION and CUSTOMS*

The “Journey of the Magi” is chock full of traditions being challenged left and right. There’s this strange sense of impending doom about the birth of Jesus, and the dawning knowledge that the old way of life for these Magi is long gone. You’d think that a poem about the birth of Jesus would be all kinds of happy about ushering in a new era of religious exaltation, but mostly this poem is moping about a long-dead past. Hey, it’s Eliot. His glass was almost always half-empty. If not shattered altogether.

*(5) SUFFERING*

As journey’s go, the “Journey of the Magi” really blows. It begins and ends with suffering, and the Magi suffer a whole lot during the journey, too, what with all the bad weather and even worse people. But there’s a bigger suffering going on here, too. There’s the psychological suffering of the dying culture of the Magi, plus the physical and mental anguish we know this kid, Jesus, will experience as he grows up to become Christ. So what do we make of all this? We think Eliot’s reminding us that a whole lot about spirituality and religion revolves around suffering, and that suffering often comes with religious transformation.

(1)

In Senehun and Mendeland at large, women are not treated as equals of men. Women are considered fragile, vulnerable and incapable of managing crises. At the beginning of the play when Gbanya drags Yoko into the inner chamber, he claims that he needs Yoko more than her Sande girls. To him, women have no responsibility than to satisfy men’s sexual urge.

Initially, Gbanya has promised Yoko she would be his successor. However, with troubles around, he feels reluctant to handover the throne to her because he believes women cannot handle a land at war. This is the same stance of Lamboi. The excuse he gives for wanting to kill Gbanya is because he does not want the latter to appoint Yoko as his successor.

In Mendeland, women usually are not allowed into the Poro cult. Yoko is the only exception. In the village, there is a certain prejudice held against women. They are considered inferior and except for Yoko who forges ahead, women are not assigned ruling positions.

CONCLUSION:- this is fully functional and verified legit Ijmb 2022 Literature in English language mind you, subscribe to our website in other to server you more and don’t forget oliveloaded is the most best plug for your exam.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button